Green Energy News

Bradford Water Auth says no to wind turbines #NY

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
The Bradford City Water Authority has turned down a request from an energy company looking to put 15 to 23 wind turbines on the watershed. At Wednesday’s meeting, the authority declined a preliminary agreement that would have allowed AES Energy “to perform a study of the watershed to determine if conditions were suitable for the installation of between 15 to 23 wind turbines,” said Steve Disney, executive director of the water authority. After the meeting, he explained that AES approached . . .

President Biden, look at Bayonne wind turbine for what NOT to do with infrastructure bill #NJ

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
Near New York Harbor stands a 400-foot-high monument, a tall alloy structure fixed against the skyline and recognizable from miles away. If you think this reference is to the Statue of Liberty, you’re wrong. The broken Bayonne wind turbine has become a local icon to a failed national infrastructure program. In 2009, the nation had seen better days. Deep amid an economic recession, President Obama needed to invigorate the economy. The approach was complex but worthy – to create a stimulus . . .

Did McKee ‘stack the deck’ for offshore wind and threaten coastal council’s credibility? #RI

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
PROVIDENCE – At the end of a contentious five-hour hearing on the South Fork Wind Farm, on May 25, the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council took up a motion by chairwoman Jennifer Cervenka. She wanted to direct the developers of the large offshore wind farm proposed in Rhode Island Sound to sit down one more time with local fishermen to talk about the creation of a fund to compensate them for fishing losses caused by the project. Ørsted and Eversource, . . .

The truth behind the polls that show support for windfarms #SCT #GBR

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
As Benjamin Disraeli said, ‘There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.’ RenewableUK, the voice of the wind and solar power industry, and the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) are keen to demonstrate that there is overwhelming public support for the development of onshore and offshore windfarms, despite increasingly vocal protests from host communities and from environmentalists concerned for the damage caused to peat lands, birds and other wildlife. So how can Renewable UK justify . . .

Plans for ‘supersized’ wind turbines in Dublin slammed for ‘favouring developers over proper planning’ #IRL

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
A Dublin TD has raised concerns over plans for a number of 300-metre high wind turbines off the coast of Dublin. Richard Boyd Barrett of People Before Profit said the government have “favoured developers over proper planning and protection of the environment”. A number of “supersized” turbines are planned for the Kish Bank from Booterstown to Bray with more planned for the Irish sea off Greystones, Arklow, and Wicklow. Deputy Boyd Barrett said: “I’m very much in favour of developing . . .

Caithness councillor accuses renewable energy body of ‘lazy, arrogant’ claims over public support for onshore wind #SCT

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
A Caithness councillor has accused a renewable energy trade body of making “lazy, complacent and arrogant” claims over the level of public approval for wind turbines. Councillor Matthew Reiss said the assertion by RenewableUK that 70 per cent of people support building onshore wind farms “is not the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth”. He said national organisations should avoid making “sweeping generalisations” and acknowledge opposition from communities close to wind farm sites – highlighting the Limekiln . . .

Go-ahead given for new wind farm at Camster after appeal to Scottish Government #SCT

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
A renewable energy company has been given the go-ahead for a new wind farm in Caithness after its appeal to the Scottish Government was upheld. The decision clears the way for RWE Renewables to install up to 11 turbines at its Camster II Wind Farm development on land some 2000 metres north-west of Tannach Hill. Its planning application was turned down in January by Highland Council, which ruled that the wind farm “would have a significantly detrimental visual impact”. In . . .

Review, public meetings set for Kitty Hawk wind project #NC

National Wind Watch: News Watch - преди 6 hours 28 min
WASHINGTON – The Department of the Interior announced Thursday that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will conduct an environmental review of the proposed Kitty Hawk wind energy project off the North Carolina coast and three online public meetings have been scheduled for August. The project, if approved, would be the first to operate offshore of North Carolina and has the potential to provide considerable economic benefits to the region during construction and throughout the project’s lifetime, officials said. The project . . .

The era of green finance

EERE Network News - Energy Storages - преди 8 hours 10 min

By Michael Castellarin and Michael Andrisani

It is a time of change and growth for the power and energy sector. One of the most important and challenging questions facing the world is how it can transition towards a more sustainable future with respect to energy generation and consumption. To make substantial progress, massive investments into the power and energy sector will be required. We are already seeing some of the world’s biggest companies and deepest-pocketed investors pile capital into the industry, in what has been coined by some as an era of “green finance.”

Companies and investors alike are seeking to get behind, and capitalize on, the decarbonization tailwinds impacting the industry. These tailwinds are likely to continue given at least 125 countries have committed to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The Biden administration is focused on decarbonization, having declared a goal of cutting U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030.

Investments in renewable energy need to significantly increase if society is to meet these stated targets and sufficiently decarbonize. Wood Mackenzie estimates that at least $50 trillion in investment will be needed to reduce fossil-fuel and other greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 if we are to meet the goals set out in the Paris climate accord.

There are clear examples of reputable investors investing – directly as an asset owner — in the power and energy sector to fully capitalize on the decarbonization trend taking hold. For instance, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, which kick-started its renewables effort in 2017, said it formed a new company, Renewable Power Capital, to boost its European investments in solar, onshore wind, and battery storage.

Green finance means more than just projects

While investments in renewable energy projects, battery storage technologies, or in improving and modernizing the electricity grid are a focus for certain investors, it is not where we play at Clairvest Group. We believe that given the growth and change discussed above, the demand for certain vital services to the power and energy industry is growing significantly. For example, in our portfolio, we have partnered with a global leader in providing a robust set of operations and maintenance services to solar power project owners. For similar reasons we are now attracted to consulting and engineering firms which have a strong practice focused on serving the changing needs of the power and energy market.

We believe that consulting and engineering firms focused on the global energy transition will generate above average growth rates and industry leading profit margins. For example, firms that provide services catered to renewable energy or distributed energy should benefit from the significant growth in these projects and the necessary planning and design work that go along with them if we are to meet the net zero goals set by 2050. The breadth of the impact on the consulting and engineering space will be pervasive. Its impact will reach firms with expertise ranging from permitting and compliance to those focusing on design and construction.

We are not alone in our interest in this space as large, diversified consulting and engineering players are keen to capitalize on the decarbonization trend and continue to be acquisitive in pursuit of it. A notable example is WSP’s acquisition of Golder earlier this year which was intended to bolster the firm’s strategy and the “transition to a more sustainable and low-carbon future.”

Other consulting and engineering companies, such as Montrose and Black & Veatch, have cited decarbonization as a major growth driver and focus area for their firms. Given the growth opportunities that lie ahead, private equity investors can provide the necessary growth capital to appropriately capitalize on trends, for example, through M&A or investments in a firm’s talent and capabilities, including significant investments in technology.

In addition to growth capital requirements, we are also witnessing succession issues in the consulting and engineering sector which make the industry an excellent candidate for private equity investment and recapitalization. There is an increasing cadre of baby boomer partners or employee-owners looking to retire. The younger and rising stars in many consulting and engineering firms often do not have the financial capacity to buy out the selling partners. As a result, a private equity firm, particularly one that focuses on minority / non-control investing, can be an excellent equity partner to assist with such an ownership transition while also providing capital for growth.

In light of the potential for significant growth as well as the need for capital for orderly succession, we are confident that there will continue to be a keen interest in investing in well-positioned consulting and engineering firms. Further, acquisition activity will continue to be pervasive as firms build size, scale, and deeper capabilities to serve the power and energy sector as it transitions to a more renewables-based future.

About the Authors

Michael Castellarin, with Clairvest since 2002, handles industry research and investment origination, structuring and execution with a focus on waste management, environmental services, facility services and industrial services.  Michael is currently on the Board of three solid waste management investments: Winters Bros. Waste Systems, DTG Recycling and Arrowhead Environmental Partners.  Since 2006, Michael has led Clairvest’s investments in seven waste management platform companies.

Prior to joining Clairvest, he worked as a management consultant at Monitor Company and as a marketing manager for the National Hockey League Players’ Association. Michael earned his M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and a B.Comm. with honours from Queen’s University at Kingston.

Michael Andrisani joined Clairvest in 2020 and participates in all areas of the investment process. Prior to joining Clairvest, Michael worked on a variety of M&A transactions in investment banking at Lazard (New York) and as an attorney at Cravath, Swaine & Moore (New York). Michael earned a JD from Osgoode Hall Law School and a MBA and Bachelor of Business Administration from the Schulich School of Business.

The era of green finance

RenewableEnergyWorld.com - Renewable Energy - преди 8 hours 10 min

By Michael Castellarin and Michael Andrisani

It is a time of change and growth for the power and energy sector. One of the most important and challenging questions facing the world is how it can transition towards a more sustainable future with respect to energy generation and consumption. To make substantial progress, massive investments into the power and energy sector will be required. We are already seeing some of the world’s biggest companies and deepest-pocketed investors pile capital into the industry, in what has been coined by some as an era of “green finance.”

Companies and investors alike are seeking to get behind, and capitalize on, the decarbonization tailwinds impacting the industry. These tailwinds are likely to continue given at least 125 countries have committed to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The Biden administration is focused on decarbonization, having declared a goal of cutting U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030.

Investments in renewable energy need to significantly increase if society is to meet these stated targets and sufficiently decarbonize. Wood Mackenzie estimates that at least $50 trillion in investment will be needed to reduce fossil-fuel and other greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 if we are to meet the goals set out in the Paris climate accord.

There are clear examples of reputable investors investing – directly as an asset owner — in the power and energy sector to fully capitalize on the decarbonization trend taking hold. For instance, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, which kick-started its renewables effort in 2017, said it formed a new company, Renewable Power Capital, to boost its European investments in solar, onshore wind, and battery storage.

Green finance means more than just projects

While investments in renewable energy projects, battery storage technologies, or in improving and modernizing the electricity grid are a focus for certain investors, it is not where we play at Clairvest Group. We believe that given the growth and change discussed above, the demand for certain vital services to the power and energy industry is growing significantly. For example, in our portfolio, we have partnered with a global leader in providing a robust set of operations and maintenance services to solar power project owners. For similar reasons we are now attracted to consulting and engineering firms which have a strong practice focused on serving the changing needs of the power and energy market.

We believe that consulting and engineering firms focused on the global energy transition will generate above average growth rates and industry leading profit margins. For example, firms that provide services catered to renewable energy or distributed energy should benefit from the significant growth in these projects and the necessary planning and design work that go along with them if we are to meet the net zero goals set by 2050. The breadth of the impact on the consulting and engineering space will be pervasive. Its impact will reach firms with expertise ranging from permitting and compliance to those focusing on design and construction.

We are not alone in our interest in this space as large, diversified consulting and engineering players are keen to capitalize on the decarbonization trend and continue to be acquisitive in pursuit of it. A notable example is WSP’s acquisition of Golder earlier this year which was intended to bolster the firm’s strategy and the “transition to a more sustainable and low-carbon future.”

Other consulting and engineering companies, such as Montrose and Black & Veatch, have cited decarbonization as a major growth driver and focus area for their firms. Given the growth opportunities that lie ahead, private equity investors can provide the necessary growth capital to appropriately capitalize on trends, for example, through M&A or investments in a firm’s talent and capabilities, including significant investments in technology.

In addition to growth capital requirements, we are also witnessing succession issues in the consulting and engineering sector which make the industry an excellent candidate for private equity investment and recapitalization. There is an increasing cadre of baby boomer partners or employee-owners looking to retire. The younger and rising stars in many consulting and engineering firms often do not have the financial capacity to buy out the selling partners. As a result, a private equity firm, particularly one that focuses on minority / non-control investing, can be an excellent equity partner to assist with such an ownership transition while also providing capital for growth.

In light of the potential for significant growth as well as the need for capital for orderly succession, we are confident that there will continue to be a keen interest in investing in well-positioned consulting and engineering firms. Further, acquisition activity will continue to be pervasive as firms build size, scale, and deeper capabilities to serve the power and energy sector as it transitions to a more renewables-based future.

About the Authors

Michael Castellarin, with Clairvest since 2002, handles industry research and investment origination, structuring and execution with a focus on waste management, environmental services, facility services and industrial services.  Michael is currently on the Board of three solid waste management investments: Winters Bros. Waste Systems, DTG Recycling and Arrowhead Environmental Partners.  Since 2006, Michael has led Clairvest’s investments in seven waste management platform companies.

Prior to joining Clairvest, he worked as a management consultant at Monitor Company and as a marketing manager for the National Hockey League Players’ Association. Michael earned his M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and a B.Comm. with honours from Queen’s University at Kingston.

Michael Andrisani joined Clairvest in 2020 and participates in all areas of the investment process. Prior to joining Clairvest, Michael worked on a variety of M&A transactions in investment banking at Lazard (New York) and as an attorney at Cravath, Swaine & Moore (New York). Michael earned a JD from Osgoode Hall Law School and a MBA and Bachelor of Business Administration from the Schulich School of Business.

US oil and gas companies should consider redirecting investments from new drilling to renewable energies

EERE Network News - Energy Storages - преди 8 hours 27 min

By Ian Palmer, PhD

The world can address greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions in different ways. The direct way is by reducing fossil fuel production, the main source at 73% of global GHG.

Europe is following this approach, perhaps because its companies don’t have the enormous success of a shale revolution to maintain. 

In Europe, companies and countries are diversifying into renewables as illustrated by the following:

  • Denmark, leading the world in wind power, recently stopped exploration for oil and gas, and plans to close its oil production by 2050.
  • Norway has a vibrant oil and gas industry, most of it exported along with a high carbon footprint. But Equinor is developing offshore wind systems, even partnering with the UK’s bp to supply electricity to New York City. Norway also leads the world in uptake of electric vehicles (EVs), now at 60% of new sales, due to national policy incentives like reducing VAT and carbon tax reductions for EVs.
  • Bp has committed to be 40% invested in renewables by 2030, and are studying plans for a large blue hydrogen plant at Teesside in the UK.
  • In France, TotalEnergies has invested $8 billion in renewables since 2016, including $2.5 billion in Adani Green Energy, where they share a 50% partnership in the company’s solar power systems.
  • By 2021, Shell in Germany will provide 10 MW of green hydrogen. In Ireland, it will be a 51% stakeholder in a 300-MW wind farm.

It’s clear the European continent is teeming with examples of integrating renewables into their future. But in the US, companies have adopted different approaches. One indirect way for reducing GHG is by companies greening their own operations – using wind or solar electricity to pump frac jobs, for instance. But this is only a very minor contribution to reducing the 73%.

A less direct way to reduce GHG is by cleaning up methane leaks from wells, pipelines, and processing facilities. To repeal rules installed last September, the U.S. Senate passed in June a new bill to remove methane leaks as a cause of air pollution in oil and gas operations and allow EPA to enact stricter methane regulations.  However, methane emissions are only 10% of all GHG emissions in the US, and less than half are due to methane leaks. So if the cleanup gets it down to zero, this is a drop of only 5% of the total 73% fossil fuel contribution.

Another method is carbon capture and storage (CCS). ExxonMobil is storing 9 million metric tons of CO2 each year, equal to 11 million car exhausts each year. The company plans to invest $3 billion for 20 new CCS facilities and even envisages a $100 billion consortium of oil and gas entities and government to capture then bury GHG under the Gulf of Mexico. “Bury” in CCS parlance means to inject CO2 deep underground where it’s contained by non-leaking rock layers, and eventually merges chemically with the rock.

However, CCS is a non-direct approach because it doesn’t stop the emission of GHG from fossil fuels. It just captures and buries the resulting GHG. But CCS will be important for the net-zero concept because it’s an escape hatch to get rid of any leftover fossil GHG.

While the EU are clearly leading by diversifying into renewables, companies in the U.S. seem to be avoiding the direct approach of cutting oil and gas production.

The appetite of legacy U.S. energy companies has largely stayed focused on what has always been their main meal: oil and gas production — including the shale revolution.

But in the US, the demand for oil and gas will likely fall if the Biden administration achieves its goals of greening electricity and changing to electric vehicles. If supply follows demand, oil and gas could fall by 30% from now to 2035-2040. 

Any of dozens of oil and gas companies thriving in the Delaware basin of southeast New Mexico could stop drilling new wells and instead invest in wind/solar systems right there in the windy Chihuahuan desert. There is money to do it — the basin made roughly $24 billion/year at the wellhead in 2019, and makes even more now in 2021. The January 2021 federal moratorium on new oil and gas well leases on federal lands provides an opportunity and motivation to do this down there.

About the Author

A petroleum engineer and consultant, Ian Palmer, PhD has worked at Los Alamos, The Department of Energy, BP, and Higgs-Palmer Technologies. He is a contributor at Forbes.com and the author of The Shale Controversy.

US oil and gas companies should consider redirecting investments from new drilling to renewable energies

RenewableEnergyWorld.com - Renewable Energy - преди 8 hours 27 min

By Ian Palmer, PhD

The world can address greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions in different ways. The direct way is by reducing fossil fuel production, the main source at 73% of global GHG.

Europe is following this approach, perhaps because its companies don’t have the enormous success of a shale revolution to maintain. 

In Europe, companies and countries are diversifying into renewables as illustrated by the following:

  • Denmark, leading the world in wind power, recently stopped exploration for oil and gas, and plans to close its oil production by 2050.
  • Norway has a vibrant oil and gas industry, most of it exported along with a high carbon footprint. But Equinor is developing offshore wind systems, even partnering with the UK’s bp to supply electricity to New York City. Norway also leads the world in uptake of electric vehicles (EVs), now at 60% of new sales, due to national policy incentives like reducing VAT and carbon tax reductions for EVs.
  • Bp has committed to be 40% invested in renewables by 2030, and are studying plans for a large blue hydrogen plant at Teesside in the UK.
  • In France, TotalEnergies has invested $8 billion in renewables since 2016, including $2.5 billion in Adani Green Energy, where they share a 50% partnership in the company’s solar power systems.
  • By 2021, Shell in Germany will provide 10 MW of green hydrogen. In Ireland, it will be a 51% stakeholder in a 300-MW wind farm.

It’s clear the European continent is teeming with examples of integrating renewables into their future. But in the US, companies have adopted different approaches. One indirect way for reducing GHG is by companies greening their own operations – using wind or solar electricity to pump frac jobs, for instance. But this is only a very minor contribution to reducing the 73%.

A less direct way to reduce GHG is by cleaning up methane leaks from wells, pipelines, and processing facilities. To repeal rules installed last September, the U.S. Senate passed in June a new bill to remove methane leaks as a cause of air pollution in oil and gas operations and allow EPA to enact stricter methane regulations.  However, methane emissions are only 10% of all GHG emissions in the US, and less than half are due to methane leaks. So if the cleanup gets it down to zero, this is a drop of only 5% of the total 73% fossil fuel contribution.

Another method is carbon capture and storage (CCS). ExxonMobil is storing 9 million metric tons of CO2 each year, equal to 11 million car exhausts each year. The company plans to invest $3 billion for 20 new CCS facilities and even envisages a $100 billion consortium of oil and gas entities and government to capture then bury GHG under the Gulf of Mexico. “Bury” in CCS parlance means to inject CO2 deep underground where it’s contained by non-leaking rock layers, and eventually merges chemically with the rock.

However, CCS is a non-direct approach because it doesn’t stop the emission of GHG from fossil fuels. It just captures and buries the resulting GHG. But CCS will be important for the net-zero concept because it’s an escape hatch to get rid of any leftover fossil GHG.

While the EU are clearly leading by diversifying into renewables, companies in the U.S. seem to be avoiding the direct approach of cutting oil and gas production.

The appetite of legacy U.S. energy companies has largely stayed focused on what has always been their main meal: oil and gas production — including the shale revolution.

But in the US, the demand for oil and gas will likely fall if the Biden administration achieves its goals of greening electricity and changing to electric vehicles. If supply follows demand, oil and gas could fall by 30% from now to 2035-2040. 

Any of dozens of oil and gas companies thriving in the Delaware basin of southeast New Mexico could stop drilling new wells and instead invest in wind/solar systems right there in the windy Chihuahuan desert. There is money to do it — the basin made roughly $24 billion/year at the wellhead in 2019, and makes even more now in 2021. The January 2021 federal moratorium on new oil and gas well leases on federal lands provides an opportunity and motivation to do this down there.

About the Author

A petroleum engineer and consultant, Ian Palmer, PhD has worked at Los Alamos, The Department of Energy, BP, and Higgs-Palmer Technologies. He is a contributor at Forbes.com and the author of The Shale Controversy.

Wind turbine manufacturer Siemens Gamesa makes loss in ‘challenging’ Q3

Latests news from Windpower Monthly - преди 8 hours 46 min
Turbine manufacturer reports triple-digit million euro loss in third quarter, but CEO buoyed by swelling order book

Record 16.8GW US onshore wind brought online in 2020 – ACP

Latests news from Windpower Monthly - Вт., 2021-07-29 20:47
Last year was a record for new US wind power, according to the American Clean Power Association (ACP), but 2021 could rival 2020

Renewables became second-most prevalent U.S. electricity source in 2020, per EIA

EERE Network News - Energy Storages - Вт., 2021-07-29 18:23

In 2020, renewables generated a record 834 billion kWh of electricity, or about 21% of all the electricity generated in the U.S., according to the Energy Information Administration, coming in second to natural gas at 1,617 billion kWh.

Renewable energy sources include wind, hydroelectric, solar, biomass and geothermal energy. Only natural gas produced more electricity than renewables in the U.S. in 2020. Renewables surpassed nuclear (790 billion kWh) and coal (774 billion kWh) generation for the first time on record. This outcome in 2020 was due mostly to significantly less coal use in U.S. electricity generation and steadily increased use of wind and solar.

In 2020, U.S. electricity generation from coal in all sectors declined 20% from 2019, while renewables increased 9%. Wind grew 14% in 2020 from 2019. Utility-scale solar generation (from projects greater than 1 MW) increased 26%, and small-scale solar (such as grid-connected rooftop solar panels) increased 19%. The specific contribution from hydropower was not listed.

Coal-fired electricity generation in the U.S. peaked at 2,016 billion kWh in 2007, and much of that capacity has since been replaced by or converted to natural gas-fired generation. Coal was the largest source of electricity in the U.S. until 2016, and 2020 was the first year that more electricity was generated by renewables and nuclear power than by coal (according to EIA’s data series that dates back to 1949). Nuclear electric power declined 2% from 2019 to 2020 because several nuclear power plants retired and other nuclear plants experienced slightly more maintenance-related outages.

EIA said it expects coal-fired electricity generation to increase in the U.S. during 2021 as natural gas prices continue to rise and as coal becomes more economically competitive. Based on forecasts in its Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA expects coal-fired electricity generation in all sectors in 2021 to increase 18% from 2020 levels before falling 2% in 2022.

EIA expects U.S. renewable generation across all sectors to increase 7% in 2021 and 10% in 2022. As a result, EIA forecasts that coal will be the second-most prevalent electricity source in 2021 and renewables will be the second-most prevalent source in 2022. EIA said it expects nuclear electric power to decline 2% in 2021 and 3% in 2022 as operators retire several generators.

Renewables became second-most prevalent U.S. electricity source in 2020, per EIA

In 2020, renewables generated a record 834 billion kWh of electricity, or about 21% of all the electricity generated in the U.S., according to the Energy Information Administration, coming in second to natural gas at 1,617 billion kWh.

Renewable energy sources include wind, hydroelectric, solar, biomass and geothermal energy. Only natural gas produced more electricity than renewables in the U.S. in 2020. Renewables surpassed nuclear (790 billion kWh) and coal (774 billion kWh) generation for the first time on record. This outcome in 2020 was due mostly to significantly less coal use in U.S. electricity generation and steadily increased use of wind and solar.

In 2020, U.S. electricity generation from coal in all sectors declined 20% from 2019, while renewables increased 9%. Wind grew 14% in 2020 from 2019. Utility-scale solar generation (from projects greater than 1 MW) increased 26%, and small-scale solar (such as grid-connected rooftop solar panels) increased 19%. The specific contribution from hydropower was not listed.

Coal-fired electricity generation in the U.S. peaked at 2,016 billion kWh in 2007, and much of that capacity has since been replaced by or converted to natural gas-fired generation. Coal was the largest source of electricity in the U.S. until 2016, and 2020 was the first year that more electricity was generated by renewables and nuclear power than by coal (according to EIA’s data series that dates back to 1949). Nuclear electric power declined 2% from 2019 to 2020 because several nuclear power plants retired and other nuclear plants experienced slightly more maintenance-related outages.

EIA said it expects coal-fired electricity generation to increase in the U.S. during 2021 as natural gas prices continue to rise and as coal becomes more economically competitive. Based on forecasts in its Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA expects coal-fired electricity generation in all sectors in 2021 to increase 18% from 2020 levels before falling 2% in 2022.

EIA expects U.S. renewable generation across all sectors to increase 7% in 2021 and 10% in 2022. As a result, EIA forecasts that coal will be the second-most prevalent electricity source in 2021 and renewables will be the second-most prevalent source in 2022. EIA said it expects nuclear electric power to decline 2% in 2021 and 3% in 2022 as operators retire several generators.

GE Renewable Energy claims success in automated wind blade finishing

Latests news from Windpower Monthly - Вт., 2021-07-29 17:20
Research partners hope automated process can improve throughput, health, safety and quality in blade finishing

Four ways to put EVs on our roads today

EERE Network News - Energy Storages - Вт., 2021-07-29 15:53

By Jim Madej, CEO, Franklin Energy

If the clean energy industry has shown us anything the past few years, it’s that it’s booming and ready to power our economy long into the future. The price declines in solar, wind, and battery storage have shown that renewables are available, economical, and growing.

However, what’s been even more evident within the clean energy industry recently is the unstoppable trend toward the electrification of transportation. The growth in electric vehicles is raising eyebrows — spurred by vehicle innovation, favorable policy changes, and advancements in battery technology. The benefits to the economy and environment are obvious; what’s less obvious will be the changes to the way our utilities operate and grow their business.

EV Growth and Questions from Utilities

According to Precedence Research, the global electric vehicle market is expected to register a compound annual growth rate of 40.7% from 2020 to 2027. Innovative technologies that make EV’s more attractive and attainable are coming to market faster. Trusted American car manufactures are quickly moving from an all-gas-powered line up to one that includes a variety of EV options.  The best example is the remarkable reception to Ford’s new F-150 Lightning pick-up truck, which shows that Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), have found a new EV market segment and are quickly making their way into the American mainstream.

But the explosive growth of EVs has utilities asking some questions. General concerns are centered around charging infrastructure, how the industry will support market growth, and how utilities will manage the inevitable spike in demand. How will EV’s change the way we manage the grid? Are EV’s an opportunity for additional revenue, or should we be shaping customer charging behavior even before an EV purchase is made to curb peak demand?

Here are four requirements to put EVs on our streets and in our driveways sooner rather than later.

Support New EV Policies

Luckily, there have been favorable policy and utility program developments across the country. A recent analysis by the ACEEE State Transportation Electrification Scorecard shows:

  • 23 states have comprehensive planning for more EV charging infrastructure
  • 15 states have utility funding for EV charging programs, including the most populated states in the nation
  • 36 states have utility programs offering a lower rate for preferred charging

This is a great start and shows the nation is on the right path. However, there is more to be done if the future includes an EV in every American driveway, and federal, state, municipal and corporate EV fleets.  

All utilities must recognize electrification of transportation for the vast market opportunity and benefit that it is. Americans currently consume roughly 8 million barrels of oil a day. In the coming years and decades, that demand for oil is going to diminish as demand for EV charging grows exponentially.

Engage Customers with Attractive Residential Charging Access

Some energy analysts and experts believe that most electric vehicle owners will charge their vehicles at home overnight. For most utilities this will present a significant revenue opportunity. A traditionally low-demand time of day will see increasing customers plug into the grid. For most utilities, this presents a significant revenue opportunity.

Many utilities are already partnering with car dealerships to set up new EV customers with at-home chargers and opportunities to opt into charging management programs. Utilities will increasingly have a unique opportunity to be a part of the EV buying customer experience, continuing to build and expand programs that provide demand response capabilities and economically managed charging solutions that don’t strain the grid.

The earlier utilities can be a part of this process, the more likely they’ll be able to build the grid programs and infrastructure that can provide value to customers and future revenue opportunities for themselves. The notion “If you build it, they will come” has never rung so true.

The earlier utilities can be a part of this process, the more likely they’ll be able to build the grid programs and infrastructure that can provide value to customers and future revenue opportunities for themselves. The notion “If you build it, they will come” has never rung so true.

It’s also increasingly likely that utilities will have the opportunity to build programs that use EVs to meet peak demand events. Beyond opting customers into demand-response programs to avoid charging during peak events, utilities can build programs that empower customers to provide power back to the grid during peak events. EVs are truly a new Swiss Army knife for utilities.

Unlock the Fleet Charging Challenge

Many utilities and state agencies are still new to the process of permitting and building public charging stations. This will change in the not-so-distant future. It is important to streamline these processes now to enable the inevitable demand for charging infrastructure in the years ahead.

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It is critical that utilities be proactive in developing processes and working with local government to ensure smooth processes and steps for electric charging construction. In some municipalities charging infrastructure must go through long bureaucratic processes that can make building charging infrastructure a +12-month pursuit. That is not going to cut it for the amount of charging we’ll soon need to support customer demand.

Identifying opportunities for fleet electrification will also be a critical component to the EV transition. Traditional fleet warehouses are not high electricity demand centers. But when a fleet of gas vehicles shift to EVs, they will be, and it is the utility that will need to service that customer segment with infrastructure upgrades. For utilities not proactively doing this, they should consider using the current moment as an opportunity to pilot, then grow programs.

Make EV Charging Equitable

To ensure the promise of EV transportation and its requisite charging is realized equitably, we also need to electrify fleets of city buses, school buses, and establish charging in multi-family units.

Although many analysts believe home charging will be a significant chunk of EV charging, many people don’t own homes. As the EV revolution gains more speed, this segment can’t be overlooked. It’s essential that as this industry grows, it benefits people of all walks of life.

Let’s ensure all Americans have positive EV experiences and benefit from transportation electrification. If we do, our environment, economy and communities will be better off for it.

About the Author

Jim Madej is the CEO of Franklin Energy and AM Conservation Group. With more than 1,200 employees and 60 utility and government partners across the US and Canada, the company’s turnkey energy efficiency and productivity solutions include building decarbonization programs, EV infrastructure, energy optimization for telecommunications, environmentally controlled agriculture, residential customers and much more.

Jim’s mission as a leader is to help catalyze our national transition to a clean energy economy in which all energy-related businesses profit from the end of climate change and the growth of our planet.

Before joining Franklin Energy, Jim was CEO at VEIC, Chief Customer Officer at National Grid USA, and the Director of National and Government Sales and Customer Services at Hess Corporation. He has also held numerous leadership roles at the General Electric Company, where he began his professional career.

Four ways to put EVs on our roads today

By Jim Madej, CEO, Franklin Energy

If the clean energy industry has shown us anything the past few years, it’s that it’s booming and ready to power our economy long into the future. The price declines in solar, wind, and battery storage have shown that renewables are available, economical, and growing.

However, what’s been even more evident within the clean energy industry recently is the unstoppable trend toward the electrification of transportation. The growth in electric vehicles is raising eyebrows — spurred by vehicle innovation, favorable policy changes, and advancements in battery technology. The benefits to the economy and environment are obvious; what’s less obvious will be the changes to the way our utilities operate and grow their business.

EV Growth and Questions from Utilities

According to Precedence Research, the global electric vehicle market is expected to register a compound annual growth rate of 40.7% from 2020 to 2027. Innovative technologies that make EV’s more attractive and attainable are coming to market faster. Trusted American car manufactures are quickly moving from an all-gas-powered line up to one that includes a variety of EV options.  The best example is the remarkable reception to Ford’s new F-150 Lightning pick-up truck, which shows that Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), have found a new EV market segment and are quickly making their way into the American mainstream.

But the explosive growth of EVs has utilities asking some questions. General concerns are centered around charging infrastructure, how the industry will support market growth, and how utilities will manage the inevitable spike in demand. How will EV’s change the way we manage the grid? Are EV’s an opportunity for additional revenue, or should we be shaping customer charging behavior even before an EV purchase is made to curb peak demand?

Here are four requirements to put EVs on our streets and in our driveways sooner rather than later.

Support New EV Policies

Luckily, there have been favorable policy and utility program developments across the country. A recent analysis by the ACEEE State Transportation Electrification Scorecard shows:

  • 23 states have comprehensive planning for more EV charging infrastructure
  • 15 states have utility funding for EV charging programs, including the most populated states in the nation
  • 36 states have utility programs offering a lower rate for preferred charging

This is a great start and shows the nation is on the right path. However, there is more to be done if the future includes an EV in every American driveway, and federal, state, municipal and corporate EV fleets.  

All utilities must recognize electrification of transportation for the vast market opportunity and benefit that it is. Americans currently consume roughly 8 million barrels of oil a day. In the coming years and decades, that demand for oil is going to diminish as demand for EV charging grows exponentially.

Engage Customers with Attractive Residential Charging Access

Some energy analysts and experts believe that most electric vehicle owners will charge their vehicles at home overnight. For most utilities this will present a significant revenue opportunity. A traditionally low-demand time of day will see increasing customers plug into the grid. For most utilities, this presents a significant revenue opportunity.

Many utilities are already partnering with car dealerships to set up new EV customers with at-home chargers and opportunities to opt into charging management programs. Utilities will increasingly have a unique opportunity to be a part of the EV buying customer experience, continuing to build and expand programs that provide demand response capabilities and economically managed charging solutions that don’t strain the grid.

The earlier utilities can be a part of this process, the more likely they’ll be able to build the grid programs and infrastructure that can provide value to customers and future revenue opportunities for themselves. The notion “If you build it, they will come” has never rung so true.

The earlier utilities can be a part of this process, the more likely they’ll be able to build the grid programs and infrastructure that can provide value to customers and future revenue opportunities for themselves. The notion “If you build it, they will come” has never rung so true.

It’s also increasingly likely that utilities will have the opportunity to build programs that use EVs to meet peak demand events. Beyond opting customers into demand-response programs to avoid charging during peak events, utilities can build programs that empower customers to provide power back to the grid during peak events. EVs are truly a new Swiss Army knife for utilities.

Unlock the Fleet Charging Challenge

Many utilities and state agencies are still new to the process of permitting and building public charging stations. This will change in the not-so-distant future. It is important to streamline these processes now to enable the inevitable demand for charging infrastructure in the years ahead.

Subscribe to Renewable Energy World’s free, weekly newsletter for more stories like this

It is critical that utilities be proactive in developing processes and working with local government to ensure smooth processes and steps for electric charging construction. In some municipalities charging infrastructure must go through long bureaucratic processes that can make building charging infrastructure a +12-month pursuit. That is not going to cut it for the amount of charging we’ll soon need to support customer demand.

Identifying opportunities for fleet electrification will also be a critical component to the EV transition. Traditional fleet warehouses are not high electricity demand centers. But when a fleet of gas vehicles shift to EVs, they will be, and it is the utility that will need to service that customer segment with infrastructure upgrades. For utilities not proactively doing this, they should consider using the current moment as an opportunity to pilot, then grow programs.

Make EV Charging Equitable

To ensure the promise of EV transportation and its requisite charging is realized equitably, we also need to electrify fleets of city buses, school buses, and establish charging in multi-family units.

Although many analysts believe home charging will be a significant chunk of EV charging, many people don’t own homes. As the EV revolution gains more speed, this segment can’t be overlooked. It’s essential that as this industry grows, it benefits people of all walks of life.

Let’s ensure all Americans have positive EV experiences and benefit from transportation electrification. If we do, our environment, economy and communities will be better off for it.

About the Author

Jim Madej is the CEO of Franklin Energy and AM Conservation Group. With more than 1,200 employees and 60 utility and government partners across the US and Canada, the company’s turnkey energy efficiency and productivity solutions include building decarbonization programs, EV infrastructure, energy optimization for telecommunications, environmentally controlled agriculture, residential customers and much more.

Jim’s mission as a leader is to help catalyze our national transition to a clean energy economy in which all energy-related businesses profit from the end of climate change and the growth of our planet.

Before joining Franklin Energy, Jim was CEO at VEIC, Chief Customer Officer at National Grid USA, and the Director of National and Government Sales and Customer Services at Hess Corporation. He has also held numerous leadership roles at the General Electric Company, where he began his professional career.

Solar panels don’t have to be ugly

EERE Network News - Energy Storages - Вт., 2021-07-29 15:00

Most people today know home solar can help you save on energy costs while reducing your carbon footprint. Plus, when you combine solar panels with a battery you don’t have to suffer through a power outage whether it’s caused by a storm, overwhelmed power grid or cyberattack. However, there are still homeowners with unshaded roofs or plenty of unshaded land for a ground mount to power their homes with sunshine who won’t even look into going solar. Sometimes it is because they perceive solar would be too expensive. (It isn’t expensive. You can literally pay $0 for panels and installation with a solar lease or PPA to lock in a lower rate than your utility.)

Once they realize how inexpensive going solar really is (you really cannot get any less expensive than no-cost panels and installation) they still might worry about what their neighbors will think of the panels on their property or that their HOA will prevent them from going solar. The fact is that HOAs in most states cannot stop you from installing solar panels due to solar access laws. However this hesitation could also be because they are unaware that panels have evolved to be more aesthetically pleasing. 

In many cases with the newer monocrystalline silicon panels (shown on the homes in the picture on this page) it is actually difficult to tell you have panels on your roof at all. This is because monocrystalline silicon panels are uniform, are black in color and have a sleeker look. (Older, polycrystalline silicon panels can still have high efficiency ratings but can seem less attractive to some people because their color looks blue since they reflect the sky. This is the result of the multiple crystals that make the product.)

But what if you understand solar is affordable, you have the perfect home for solar, you can see that solar panels’ appearance has evolved, but still think they are ugly? There may be no way to change your perception of what is pretty to look at, but if you still have the desire to do your part to protect our environment, and wouldn’t mind ending up with lower or zero electricity costs, why not consider how beautiful solar panels really are compared to the alternatives?

Three Things Uglier Than Solar Panels

1) POLLUTION: Air, land and water pollution from fossil fuels is hideous. If you are not solar-powered most of the energy your home uses comes from coal-fired power plants and/or dirty oil. Pollution destroys animals, plants and healthy ecosystems. It also kills humans from carcinogens and poison in water and food supplies. Even people who do not believe climate change has anything to do with human activity dislike pollution. No one wants their children or grandchildren to get sick from poison in the air and water. One of the best things about the energy generated by solar panels is that it is emission free.

2) RISING UTILITY COSTS: What’s uglier than seeing your electricity bill growing bigger every month? Rate hikes are a never-ending fact of life now unless your home is solar-powered.  Even if you are in the one percent of top income earners who doesn’t have to worry about watching your budget, saving thousands of dollars on energy costs and/or earning profits from your solar investment can’t be a bad thing. Most wealthy people like to save money and generate a strong return on their investments. Solar panels can do both.

3) WAR: Fighting over oil rights and relying on foreign governments who are not our friends for our energy supply is terrible and really, really ugly. America has the means to become more energy independent without drilling, mining and plundering our public lands. The sun above belongs to all of us. Millions of American homeowners know this and proudly run their homes on sunshine. This is why a new solar system is now installed in America every 90 seconds.

Homes in sunny neighborhoods without solar will become obsolete 

A lesser known fact is that your whole neighborhood is rewarded when you go solar. By running your home on sunshine you benefit everyone around you because the excess energy you produce goes back into the energy grid, reducing the the chances of a power shortage due to strain on the grid. It also helps to decrease their energy costs, not just yours.

Solar adoption across the USA is increasing every day. It won’t be long before almost all sunny neighborhoods are solar-powered and homes without solar panels in those neighborhoods will look outdated and passé. Some experts predict HOAs will eventually begin to require everyone goes solar.  Until that day, however, it would be wise to consider that there are much uglier things to worry about then the way a clean energy system looks.

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